Riviste scientifiche

[Comment] Is WHO ready to improve its country work?

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
The health status of people has changed dramatically across the world—in most cases for the better. People live longer and sometimes also healthier lives. In most countries, capacity to manage health issues has improved and health priorities have changed. However, WHO has not yet fully adjusted to these changing realities, but there is an opportunity now with a new Director-General and leadership team in place.

[Comment] 2017 Wakley Prize Essay

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
We would like to thank the many readers who entered the 2017 Wakley Prize Essay. The winning essay published in this issue was selected by Lancet editors and is “You Don't Know Me” by Kate Rowland, an Assistant Professor at the Department of Family Medicine at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA. Kate is board certified in family medicine and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. She's worked as a family physician for 10 years and her professional interests include understanding how doctors make decisions during patient care and learning about how new medical evidence is taken up in practice.

[Comment] Offline: Are China's global ambitions good for global health?

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
A bitter argument is taking place between two nations, a dispute that could have profound effects for the future of global health. China and Australia are geographic neighbours. During the past decade, both countries have worked hard to build strong trading and diplomatic relationships. They have succeeded. But those relationships are now being torn apart. China's Xinhua News Agency last week claimed that Australia's Government was “obsessed” with “criticising China”. Xinhua argued that Australia's Government was trying “to undermine bilateral political trust”.

[This Year in Medicine] 2017: a year in review

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
2017 was not only a year marred by conflict-driven humanitarian crises and political quagmires but also a year for biomedical innovation and women's empowerment. Farhat Yaqub looks back.

[World Report] US Children's Health Insurance Program in jeopardy

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
Without adequate federal funding, CHIP is on the verge of collapse in several states. Susan Jaffe, The Lancet's Washington correspondent, reports.

[Highlights] Highlights 2017: health in focus

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
The fleeting moments captured in a photograph can tell powerful stories. Earlier this year we asked readers to send us striking pictures on any health topic for The Lancet's annual photography competition, Highlights. We were delighted by the response. Lancet editors selected these ten winning pictures from the varied and interesting photographs you sent us.

[Correspondence] WHO leadership is essential for the elimination of NTDs

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
The second director of the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) of WHO retired at the end of September, 2017. He was appointed in 2014 to ensure administrative stability after 9 years of innovative growth of this WHO department, which was established in 2005 after the retirement of the first director.1 Sustaining the momentum for elimination of NTDs requires a timely appointment of a new director to lead an effective Department of NTDs in WHO.

[Correspondence] Are new technologies translatable to point-of-care testing?

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
The point-of-care testing (PoCT) market is rapidly expanding and its predicted worth by 2021 is US$36·96 billion.1 This market has many facets, one of which is tumour and cancer markers. To develop a new test for clinical use, a biomarker needs to be identified and a quick and simple detection method developed. This biomarker then goes through many steps before clinical use including the all-important step—can it detect cancer earlier than existing methods?

[Correspondence] Changes to NHS charges: what does this mean for our most vulnerable patients?

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
August, 2017, saw the introduction of new regulations on health-care charges to migrants and overseas visitors in England.1 Patients who are unable to prove entitlement to free care will receive an estimated treatment bill, which must be fully paid before receipt of care, and might increase exponentially. Urgent treatment, as defined by the treating clinician, should be provided and billed for afterwards. These regulations are the outcome of only 418 responses obtained by the Department of Health from their consultation exploring the extension of charging overseas visitors and migrants who use the National Health Service (NHS).

[Correspondence] Concerns about cardiotoxicity in the HERA trial

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
In the HERceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial (Feb 16, p 1195),1 the investigators reported that cardiac toxicity remained low in all groups and occurred mostly during the treatment phase. Cardiac assessments included repeated use of the New York Heart Association classification and left ventricular ejection fraction assessed by a cardiologist. However, the absence of information regarding radiation-related cardiac hazard might have caused misinterpretation of the data.

[Correspondence] Concerns about cardiotoxicity in the HERA trial – Authors' reply

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
We would like to thank Antonin Levy and colleagues for their interest in our Article reporting the 11-year outcome data from the HERceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial,1 and their expressed concern that we might not have recorded all long-term cardiac consequences of treatment for early breast cancer, specifically, some that could be secondary to the use of radiotherapy.

[Wakley Prize Essay] You don't know me

The Lancet - Sa, 23/12/2017 - 00:00
“You don't know who I am, do you?”

China tackles climate change with world’s largest carbon market

New Scientist - Ve, 22/12/2017 - 11:20
The Chinese state hopes to use market forces to encourage energy-hungry firms to seek cleaner alternatives, but simply telling them what to do may be more effective

Odd fossils hint first complex life hung on long after its time

New Scientist - Ve, 22/12/2017 - 10:00
The strange Ediacarans were some of the earliest complex organisms on Earth. They are thought to have died out 540 million years ago but eight odd fossils suggest they survived far longer

[Editorial] Personalised medicine in the UK

The Lancet - Ve, 22/12/2017 - 00:30
The future of personalised and genomic medicine in the UK was debated on Dec 14 in a seminar organised by the Westminster Health Forum.

2017 review: The 12 best science and tech stories of the year

New Scientist - Gi, 21/12/2017 - 19:00
From the first gene-editing of human embryos to Cassini’s death plunge into Saturn, we round up the most amazing news stories of the year

2017 review: The 12 best science and tech stories of the year

New Scientist - Gi, 21/12/2017 - 19:00
From the first gene-editing of human embryos to Cassini’s death plunge into Saturn, we round up the most amazing news stories of the year

Earth was smashed by a rock the size of Mars to make the moon

New Scientist - Gi, 21/12/2017 - 18:58
4.5 billion years ago, a rock called Theia crashed into Earth and formed the moon. Now we know that it was probably only about a tenth the mass of our planet

Shocking drop in life expectancy shows US still in bad health

New Scientist - Gi, 21/12/2017 - 17:13
Amid a glut of drug overdoses, gun deaths and suicide, shorter lives and poorer health are becoming the new norm in the US. It's alarming, says Laudan Aron

Shocking drop in life expectancy shows US still in bad health

New Scientist - Gi, 21/12/2017 - 17:13
Amid a glut of drug overdoses, gun deaths and suicide, shorter lives and poorer health are becoming the new norm in the US. It's alarming, says Laudan Aron
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