Riviste scientifiche

Jellyfish offer a sticky solution to the problem of plastic pollution

New Scientist - %age fa
Our oceans are full of microplastics and unnatural swarms of jellyfish. Could these beautiful animals possess a secret weapon to help clean up the environment?

Our primate ancestors may have originated in Europe or North America

New Scientist - %age fa
It was thought that the ancestor we share with lemurs, monkeys and apes evolved in Asia, but fossil analysis suggests this may not have been the case

Stunning fossils show pterosaurs had primitive feathers like dinosaurs

New Scientist - %age fa
When dinosaurs ruled the land, pterosaurs occupied the skies. Now we know they had feathers, suggesting plumage has a much deeper history than we had thought

How clever chemistry is making plastic fantastic again

New Scientist - %age fa
Plastic waste threatens a wide range of ecosystems all over the planet. But innovative ways of making, reusing and recycling plastic are set to change our relationship with this extraordinary material

Coral Whisperers review – How global warming is changing researchers

New Scientist - %age fa
In the battle to save resources as vital as coral, researchers increasingly face a world where scholarly thought is blown away by the need for urgent action

Home Futures review – what living spaces teach us about our culture

New Scientist - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 11:00
From robo-walking cities to living rooms that fold away, the revolutionary ideas on show at London's Design Museum tell us much about the way we live

The secret site in England where beavers control the landscape

New Scientist - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 09:00
Two beavers were released at a secret location in Devon, UK in 2011. Now they've completely transformed the landscape including improving flood management in the area

[Editorial] Prophesying in surgery

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
Predicting the future is a human preoccupation but not one without risks. Predictions tend to expand on current trajectories, missing the big disrupters and barriers, and rendering them inaccurate. In 1930, The Lancet published an editorial on the future of surgery discussing the forecasts of A F Hurst, a surgeon at Guy's Hospital, who had recently published his deliberations in the hospital gazette. He considered cancer and gallstones were likely to be “only a very small problem to the future surgeon” and was convinced that the prevention of cancer would be in sight within 25 years.

[Comment] 2019 The Lancet–CAMS Health Conference: a call for abstracts

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and the Lancet family of journals invite abstract submissions for the 2019 The Lancet–CAMS Health Conference, to be held on Oct 19–20, 2019, in Chengdu, China. West China Hospital, Sichuan University, will be the local co-organiser with CAMS in Chengdu. 2019 will mark the fifth collaborative conference between CAMS and the Lancet family of journals to support medical research in China.

[Comment] Health-care reform in China: a call for papers

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
In 2009, China unveiled its ambitious health-care reform plan, with the goal of provision of affordable and equitable basic health care for all by 2020.1 The reform is anchored in five interdependent areas: expanding coverage to insure more than 90% of the population, establishing a national essential medicines system, improving the primary care system, making public health services available and equal for all, and public hospital reforms. How has China changed since the 2009 health-care reform?

[World Report] Funding falling for mine victim assistance

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
Funding for victim assistance has been cut back to just 2% of international support funding needed despite high casualty numbers, John Zarocostas reports.

[World Report] State exemptions to the Affordable Care Act expanded

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
In its latest blow to the ACA, the Trump administration provides guidance on how states can circumvent the health law. Susan Jaffe, The Lancet's Washington correspondent, reports.

[Perspectives] Digital snake oil

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
Silicon Valley is a crucible of contemporary power. Technology parks burgeon with purposeful startups. Sometimes the Silicon Valley dare pays back handsomely with successes such as Apple, Google, and Airbnb. Sometimes the bite back comes after years of success—like Facebook and the scandals of fake news and data handling. Then there are companies like Tesla with an enormous idea and investment but little financial return as yet. And then there is Theranos, a medical technology company whose story serves as a surreal parable for how not to do it.

[Perspectives] The Great War's new body

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
5 years after the end of World War 1, on Oct 18, 1923, the British physiologist Ernest Starling delivered the celebrated Harveian Oration before the Royal College of Physicians. He titled his speech The Wisdom of the Body, echoing Job 38:36, “Who hath put wisdom in the inward parts?” Starling thought his own achievements, from his early work on hormones to the law of the heart, led inexorably to the new picture of the body that he offered to his audience. He concluded optimistically that although “the ocean of the unknown still stretches far and wide in front of us”, nevertheless “we know the directions in which we would sail, and […] only labour is required to extend almost without limit our understanding of the human body and our control of its fate”.

[Obituary] Aaron Klug

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
Nobel Prize winning molecular biologist. He was born in Zelva, Lithuania, on Aug 11, 1926, and died in Cambridge, UK, with a neurodegenerative disease on Nov 20, 2018, aged 92 years.

[Correspondence] Low back pain

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
The Lancet Low Back Pain Series Working Group (June 9, p 2384)1 is to be commended for its call for action on low back pain. Unmet needs in health care, public health, and clinical research must be highlighted. However, the implication that patients with a common symptom of low back pain can adequately be lumped together under a homogeneous biopsychosocial umbrella conflicts with the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, which focuses on body function and structure, in addition to activity, participation, and personal and environmental factors.

[Correspondence] Low back pain

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
We are not convinced that the proposals made by the Lancet Low Back Pain Series Working Group,1 which broadly reflect current national guidance,2 are rational or supported by sufficient evidence. Pain is a symptom, not a diagnosis. Without a diagnosis there is little rationale for intervention. Only with a meaningful diagnosis can there be discussion of the risks and benefits of potential interventions. Interventions not based on diagnosis risk being dishonest.

[Correspondence] Low back pain

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
The Lancet Series papers on low back pain (June 9, p 2356)1,2 provide a comprehensive review of the causes, prevention, and treatment of low back pain. One possible cause of low back pain often missed by physicians is abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture (or impending rupture).3–5 Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are associated with mortality rates as high as 80% and are often misdiagnosed because of non-specific presenting symptoms, including shock, syncope, low back pain, and nausea or vomiting.

[Correspondence] Low back pain

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
We read with interest the Lancet Series on low back pain1,2 outlining the causes, consequences, and challenges associated with low back pain. However, the authors might have collectively missed a valuable opportunity to acknowledge the emerging link between chronic pain, accelerated cognitive decline, and dementia given that there are over 46 million people worldwide living with dementia at a cost of US$818 billion, with the number of people projected to almost double every 20 years.3 Dementia is, after all, Britain's single biggest killer.

[Correspondence] Low back pain

The Lancet - Sa, 15/12/2018 - 00:00
The Lancet Series on low back pain1 gives a comprehensive overview of strategies to prevent and treat low back pain. The treatment of low back pain remains challenging, as is the interpretation of the evidence. We would like to comment on two statements made by Nadine E Foster and colleagues.1
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